News Releases

tiwi™ teen-driving safety system becomes founding sponsor of the Teen Driving Council

DALLAS, TX - FEB. 25, 2008 - SALT LAKE CITY-based inthinc™, the company that has developed the tiwi™ teen-driving safety system, has announced a commitment to become the founding sponsor of the Teen Driving Council, a new not-for-profit organization that seeks to emerge as the nation's leading voice on the issue of teen driving safety.

"The need for a louder, clearer voice that will unite all parties in this issue is all too evident," explained Todd Follmer, chairman and CEO of inthinc, which has been a leading provider of driver-safety systems for the commercial fleet industry for more than 10 years. "The harsh reality is that nearly every one of us, in virtually any corner of our nation, can speak first-hand of damage and deaths relating to a teen-driving crash in our own community. On the average of every 55 seconds, a teen is involved in a crash in the United States.

"The Teen Driving Council's core mission to serve as the one central resource for the most current and valuable information, tools and events for teens, parents, schools and local and national organizations could not be more urgent. We are proud to provide our support in order to initiate and expedite many of the Council's goals for the coming year."

The Teen Driving Council has established its national headquarters in Dallas, Texas, but plans are in place to develop local and regional presences throughout the nation. The Council is currently forming its management team and advisory boards, with the goal of assembling highly visible and diverse groups of citizens, educators, business leaders and public officials to address the issues and solutions from all sectors. Similarly, the Teen Driving Council is also launching a campaign to engage teens in advisory-level boards and other collaborative events that help inform and protect their peers - many of which will be directed through the Council's official website, www.TeenSafety.com.

On its website, the Teen Driving Council describes its objective to "begin dramatically diminishing the odds of a teen being involved in a crash through a series of innovative awareness initiatives. While that goal could appear overly idealistic to some observers, consider this: 85% of crashes by 16-year-old drivers are attributed to teen driver error."

"It is clear that something has to change," explained Follmer, who will serve as the Council's CEO for 2008. "Now, through the Teen Driving Council, a coalition of concerned parents, teens, schools, non-profit organizations, opinion leaders and businesses are joining together to accelerate the speed and scope of this long-needed shift in perceptions and, more importantly, actions. We welcome other individuals and organizations to join us as we look for new and powerful ways to protect teen drivers and all of the lives that they impact."